Types Of Charges In Houston

Here in a big city like Houston, there are many crimes that the police deal with each year. What you might not know I that these charges all require different amounts of payment in order to get released on bail.

Theft (between $1,500 and $20,000 value) Charges and Bail Bonds

This crime carries some gray areas in terms of how to formally charge. Depending on the crime (and the criminal), it can be classified as a state jail felony or a class A misdemeanor. Either way, this crime mandates anytime between 180 to 2 years in jail, along with a fine of up to $10,000.

When it comes to setting the bond, it’s completely up to the discretion of the judge. However, certain factors play in (including the criminal’s history) and with a misdemeanor, a bond can be set anywhere between $1,000 and $5,000. For state jail felonies, that amount can go anywhere upwards of $5,000 to $20,000. Since bail is set at 10% of the total bond, an inmate can bail from anywhere between $500 to $2,000.

Robbery Charges and Bail Bonds

Unlike theft, robbery involves direct one-on-one contact between the criminal and the victim—which, typically, is hostile. Because that’s the case, robbery typically charges as a second-degree felony; this comes with a fine of up to $10,000, and anytime between 2 to 20 years in prison.

That is, however, if it wasn’t aggravated; if this is indeed the case, it escalates to a first-degree felony. With a first-degree felony charge, you can expect anything between 5 years to life in prison, along with a fine of up to $10,000.

For felony bail bonds, inmates charged with robbery can have a bond set anywhere between $5,000 to $20,000, and even more depending on the crime. Additionally, if the criminal is considered a “high-risk” inmate, the judge can choose to either set an impossibly high amount or no bond at all.

Burglary Charges and Bail Bonds

Burglary is different from robbery and theft in which it involves breaking into a residence, building, business, vehicle, or machine. However, like robbery, burglary charges vary widely depending on the nature of the crime. For instance, burglary of a coin-operated machine or vehicle is classified as a class A misdemeanor, which carries up to a year in Houston County Jail and/or a fine of up to $4,000.

Burglary of a building, however, is much different. In this case, it would be classified as a state jail felony; this lands anywhere between 180 days to 2 years in Houston state jail (Kegans ISF), along with a fine of up to $10,000. Burglaries even have the potential of carrying a first degree felony charge. If the crime is a burglary of a habitation with intent to commit or sponsor a felony, it’s a first degree felony charge with anywhere between 5 years to life in prison, along with a fine of up to $10,000.

Aggravated Assault Charges and Bail Bonds

A general assault (with bodily injury) can be a class A misdemeanor or a felony, depending on the relationship between the assailant and the victim. If there’s no romantic relationship between them, it can typically be charged as a class A misdemeanor (if, of course, the criminal doesn’t have a familiar criminal history).

However, aggravated assault—including assault of a romantic interest, partner, or spouse—is anywhere from a second degree felony charge, to a first degree felony. Second degree felony aggravated assault carries anywhere between 2 years to 20 years in prison, along with a fine of up to $10,000. In cases where there’s an existing romantic relationship between the assailant and the victim—or if the victim is a public servant—it’s almost always a first degree felony. This typically comes with a life sentence (or anywhere between 5 to 99 years) and a fine of up to $10,000.

For aggravated assault bail bonds, there’s a huge gray area—depending on, like we said, the relationship between the criminal and victim—due to the uniqueness of each case. An inmate’s bond can be set anywhere between $5,000 to hundreds of thousands, depending on the severity of the crime and the criminal history of the assailant.

DWI Charges and Bail Bonds

DWI in Houston is also very common. However, different charges go for each case, which depends on the nature of the crime and the criminal’s own history.

  • First DWI offense: class B misdemeanor; this comes with up to 180 days in Houston County Jail and/or a fine of up to $2,000. A bail bond for this charge can be set up to $200 (10% of $2,000).
  • Second DWI offense: class A misdemeanor; this comes with up to a year in Houston County Jail and a fine of up to $4,000. A bail bond for this charge can be set up to $400.
  • Third DWI offense: third degree felony; this comes with anytime between 2 to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. A bail bond for this charge can be set up to $1,000.

DWI with child passenger: state jail felony; this comes with anytime between 180 days to 2 years in Houston County Jail or Kegans ISF (Houston State Jail) and a fine of up to $10,000. A bail bond for this charge can be set up to $1,000 (or more, depending on the judge).

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